Govt tells states, UTs not to share data on vaccine stocks & temperature storage in public


File photo of workers unloading boxes of Bharat Biotech’s Covaxin | Representational image | Photo: ANI


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New Delhi: The Centre has written to the states and Union territories, advising them not to share the data of the Electronic Vaccine Intelligence Network (eVIN) system on vaccine stocks and the temperature of vaccine storage at public forums, and stating that it is a “sensitive information and to be used only for programme improvement”.

In a recent letter to the states, the Union health ministry said the Centre, with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has rolled out the eVIN system under UIP, which is used to track the vaccine stock status and the temperature at all levels of vaccine storage, from national to the sub-district level.

In the letter, the health ministry said it was overwhelming to see that all the states are using the system to update the stock and transactions of Covid vaccines on a daily basis.

“In this regard, please be advised that data and analytics generated by eVIN for inventory and temperature is owned by the Ministry of Health and not to be shared with any other organisation, partner agency, media agency, online and offline public forums without the consent of the ministry.

“This is very sensitive information and to be used only for programme improvement,” said the letter written by Pradeep Haldar, Advisor, Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) to all mission directors of the National Health Mission in all the states and Union territories. –PTI


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